Parked Electric Cars Set to Power Buildings from Parking Lot

Parked electric car

Parked electric car. Credit: Public Domain/mmurphy

A new wave of electricity supply stands poised to power large buildings. The energy stored in the batteries of idle electric vehicles (EVs) could boost the grid power of the buildings and increase the lifespan of the vehicle batteries, according to groundbreaking research from Warwick Manufacturing Group at the University of Warwick.

Dr. Kotub Uddin, a senior research fellow at the University of Warwick and his team from WMG’s Energy and Electrical Systems group and Jaguar Land Rover have demonstrated how the vehicle-to-grid (V2G) technology can astutely take energy from idle electric vehicle (EV) batteries and pump it into the grid to power buildings without battery degradation. The new research on V2G algorithm also shows that the vehicle battery life could improve by around 10% over a year.

The researchers used the University campus as a simulation model. The 5,560 car parking spaces in multiple parking lots in the school had a base assumption of being occupied by 120 building-connected EVs. The research team used the smart grid technology and found that there was enough capacity to load-level their 360-researcher building at the University. The researchers stated that renewable energies were a key pillar of power sector decarbonisation. They added that an EV connected to the smart-grid could accommodate the demand of the power network with an increased share of clean renewable energy.

Dr. Uddin’s research team analysed some of the world’s most advanced lithium-ion batteries that were used in commercial EVs to predict battery capacity under acceleration factors inclusive of the state of charge, current, depth of discharge, and temperature. Dr. Uddin said that the findings reinforced the attractiveness of V2G technologies to automotive Original Equipment Manufacturers. He added V2G is an effective solution for grid support and could also tidy a revenue stream.

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